Friday, May 13, 2005

Sleep and Serve

For stay-in personals, the most you can get from the hours spent in bunk is sleeping – especially during office hours.

Well, it’s not that I like to encourage everyone to chao geng, but sometimes it’s just sad that in NS they make sleeping like crime like that. I remember in the first few months of BMT most of us were so tired that we slept a lot at home OVER THE WEEKEND when we book out – sigh, sleeping our precious book-out time away.

Read on for some tips on getting the sleep that army has short-changed you.

For stay-in personals, the most you can get from the hours spent in bunk is sleeping – especially during office hours. Well, of course there are more fun things to do during office hours than sleeping: reading (from newspaper to comics to FHM), talking cock, playing Gameboy, Monopoly, Mahjong (cards lah) even the super brainless game of 飞机棋 (the game where you control 4 aeroplanes and must throw a ‘6’ to leave “base”) (yes, we have done ALL of these before). But the risk of getting caught is too high - it just take one sabo-king to laugh too loud in the midst of the fun and that’s it – our bunk is just one level above the offices, and it only takes CSM a minute or so to do a spot check and we can kiss our weekend goodbye.

So, sleeping, aka “individual body maintenance” in the army, is the lowest risk option – if you sleep in a “tactical” position and provided you didn’t snore too loudly, you can usually escape enemy (everyone higher rank than you) detection.

Rule number 1: Never ever sleep ON the bed during office hours, not even lie down to take a rest. Doing that is like wearing the “arctic avenger” suit (the all-white terrorist suit in CS, remember?) and fighting in the Singapore jungle. Confirm gana.

There is once when we are slacking in bunk during office hours. One of us is sleeping on the bed, and the rest of us are doing equally zuo-bo-lan things like reading comics/newspapers. Our 2IC come in suddenly, and he straightaway asks that poor guy who is sleeping on the bed to go and sign.

Rule number 2: The space between the beds is YOUR bed during office hours. It’s damn funny that suddenly someone will be super garang and take out broom and dustpan when there is no stand-by-bed coming. He will giggle and then sweep the area between his bed and his buddy’s and make sure that it’s super clean, before resting his body on the ground.

My form teacher who was in his 50s said that during his time in OCS, the rules about maintaining a super neat bed was so strict that they all just choose to sleep on the floor every night. He said that now he regretted that because he thinks that sleeping on the cold concrete floor is really damaging for the bones (somehow it’s the problem of concrete sucking the heat of the body, from a traditional Chinese medical point of view). So, to protect your body against that (after all, you can downgrade all you want in army, but better be healthy after you ORD), I usually put a ground sheet on the floor (not SAF one: so troublesome to fold back nicely in case got inspection… just some E-mart one.

Some people go for comfort: they just take down the pillow from their bed and put it on the floor… well, a slightly more alert CSM will spotted that your bed doesn’t have a pillow and that’s really hong-gan. (Visual aid: if you play Commandos II or Metal Gear Solid, imagine CSM scanning around, see your bed without pillow, and a question mark rises above his head, and the next moment you game over).

So, bear with discomfort: just sleep on ur civi-bag (stuff some clothes), or have those inflatable pillow (really good to invest in one). Well, if you are really desperate, sleep on your pile of dirty clothes accumulated over the week also can =p.

Rule Number 3: Things to watch out for:

Some people like to stretch their legs and their boots became visible (no longer shielded from the bed). That’s really sabo-king lah. When your sergeant/CSM walk by your bunk, it’s damn obvious if someone’s leg is sticking out on the floor.

Also, (as always), switch off your handphone. If your sergeant call you and you pick up (woken up from sleep), you will definitely sound like you just woke up, and usually when you are shagged you can’t think of a good excuse to cover up. That’s it. If you don’t pick up the phone, the ringing sound will give yourself away. (Even the vibration mode is damn obvious).

Oh yah, for the ultimate tactical move: switch off the fans when you sleep – yeah it’s hot and stuffy, but sometimes some CSM will just cao beh about people not switching the fans off when they leave the bunk. (Well, honestly I doubt you can save much money from switching off the fans when they themselves have air-conditioned offices).

Well, it’s not that I like to encourage everyone to chao geng, but sometimes it’s just sad that in NS they make sleeping like crime like that. I remember in the first few months of BMT most of us were so tired that we slept a lot at home OVER THE WEEKEND when we book out – sigh, sleeping our precious book-out time away. Given that most of us don’t have the luxury of staying out, the only thing we could do is to do as much thing as possible in camp (it’s really funny how, on Saturday morning before book-out (okie, now all 5-day week) people will start bathing, shitting and doing all sorts of things so that they don’t have to do that AT HOME to conserve whatever book-out time we have. Sigh.. those were the days.


17 comments:

Edwin said...

why the big white spaces....

lolx

well, very interesting... :D very.

Edwin said...

i think there is something wrong with the template.

Gerad said...

For the record, your post is slightly out-dated le.

Recruits are allowed to lie on beds when they have nothing to do.

The maximum no of pushups they can do is 20. It is strictly enforced.

There is a time period between each punishments, 20 mins - ie when you are knocked down and recovered, a FULL 20 min has to pass before you are allowed to take another physical punishments.

It's all true. And the rules are fully enforced, go ask any BMTC instructor now and verify.

slave@work said...

so gone are the days when push up can go "1,2,3,4...2,2,3,4,...20,2,3,4(you get the pic)and add a few more samura to make it a full hundred...sigh...gone are the days

The Panopticon said...

only some companies allow recruits to sleep on their beds during office hours, not all. And as for the limit of punishments, my company flouted those rules a few times already, i still remember incidents but it doesnt really bother me that much anyway. But for the tactical sleeping thing, i can relate to it cos i'm also guilty of it, i mean after all that running and shit the least u wanna do is get some rest, even if it means taking ur pillow and sleeping in the 2m long, 40cm wide space between the bed and the window and enduring all that built up dust and not forgetting the fact that im a 6 footer, not very comfortable i tell you

Hai~Ren said...

Hahaha... indeed, those were the days... whole bunk smoke out but actually hiding in bunk (and hiding from sergeant and CSM)

兩鈖錢 said...

sleeping issue is strict in training sch, but in unit, it ain't that strict, maybe unit tends to be more slack

On Eagle's Wings said...

The 20 push up nosh and sleeping on bed stuff is true. But instructors, (I myself included) sometimes find ways to go around it.. Hehe..

Pkchukiss said...

My BMTC company had one of the stricter rules on sleeping during office hours, which they defined carefully as the time from before first parade to the last parade. In between, we had to keep the bed immaculately clean and tautly stretched. Nobody dared to flout the rules, so we resorted to sleeping on the floor. Dust wasn't an issue, since the daily area inspection meant that the floor is relatively clean.

When I got posted to my unit, I thought that the same rules applied. They proved me right, for a time. The rest of my time as a first year soldier, we were not allowed to lie on the bed during office hours (coincidentally, they had the same definition of "office hours"). I noted though, that the sergeants here are really indifferent to what we do, so some start to blatantly flout the rule — until the platoon sergeant goes up for a little chat... We then proceed with a little exercise: not too much, ten would do. Couple it with a few jabs by him to the culprits, he would then leave the room. The culprits take their cue and resume their original positions on the bed.

Now even that has changed: The same platoon sergeant has relaxed his rules, probably as a result of general liberalisation of the company's stand on acquiring rest during office hours. On his trips to the bunks, he will find bodies sprawled all over the used-to-be-taut bed sheets. Sometimes he joins in our activity on the rare occassion that he had cleared the day's work, usually he resorts to jealous remarks about sleepy NSFs...

kureshii said...

Well, I think it's obvious that training schools have tougher discipline. As long as you're a trainee you have to abide very strictly by the school rules, even if you're an officer. And to be a trainee usually means other people are allowed to scold you and tell you off, even if they're of lower rank than you. That's the way it is.

Sheesh, recruits really have it easy nowadays. Duffel bags with their field packs, and no more than 20 pushups in 20 min. Tekong is really turning into a seaside holiday chalet. I still remember vividly the thinner recruits in my company coming close to collapsing as they carried the ali-baba duffel bag to the coy line.

Personally, I don't see what's wrong with sleeping. If you settle things on your side sui sui and really have nothing else to do, go ahead and catch some beauty shuteye. But I do have conditions:

If woken up/activated to do sai kang I want no complaints, even if it is just a false alarm. It is during office hours, you are not allowed to be sleeping anyway so consider it a privilege to be able to close your eyes without getting caught.

Sleep in the drivers' office (out of sight, of course), or in the rest area. Anyone caught sleeping anywhere else without permission will be considered to be chaokenging.

If you have been assigned tasks for the day by SOP/word of mouth, they better be carried out before sleeping. Weekly preventive tasks, duty drivers' instructions, etc will be followed through before you are allowed to rest.

lun said...

gerad: max 20 in 20 min? strictly enforced? what bullshit. my best pal's a pc in bmtc2, and basically nothing much has changed. they still whack the recruits like fuck. in some companies, TSR pertaining to punishment of recruits is virtually non-existent at times. knocking down in FBO, rifle PT in FBO, and there's still instances of change parades as well. where did u get ur information from anyway?

兩鈖錢 said...

?? 20min thing in the TSR? haha just push up position for 20 min is good enough for anyone. =D

as for me, i use other type of punishment for my men. No push up. Strictly training their handwriting and how fast they can write.

kureshii an officer right? you can try the method, it work. i tried it and it works fine for me.
take for example ( 200 line of i will remember to lock my bunk in a day.)

jk said...

wahhaha! primary school punishment...

unit oso max 20 push ups...start from -100, or o-n-e one, t-w-o two...

兩鈖錢 said...

yes it primary sch kind of punishment but it good it efficient.

did that confirm that =)

jly69 said...

When I was doing my section commander's course at SAFTI back in 1974, there was a platoon mate would was caught nodding his head during a lecture by the OC. The OC asked him why he was dozing off. The trainee replied that he was too tired from all the training and lack of sleep. The OC was very understanding and concerned about his welfare. He told the CSM that the trainee would be confined to bed through the weekend for compulsory sleeping to catch up with his sleep. The COS is to ensure that he gets out of bed for his meals and toilet visits only.

kureshii said...

well, lan~ren, yeah I kena that in OCS before. twice. And the second time it wasn't my fault, but then...

In a training school such punishments would be part and parcel of the wholesome list of standard punishments. It is far less effective in a unit, though. Especially a logistics unit.

gaston said...

Who say 20 pushups 20 minutes??? Maybe for BMT Coys like Leppard and Scorpion maybe la. I was from "T", part of the triumvirate M-T-V. FBO Push-Ups, Hold It There 20 minutes, Late Book-out Early Book In, No Sleeping On Bed Still, Wake Up Middle Of Night Go Lift Lobby Whack Pushups, Early Morning 1 minute late Run Around Track Under 1 Minute Sammurrah 3 Times Everytime Cos They Claim Some Fat Fucks Never Make It Back In Time Must Be Chum Siong With PE Teacher To Pass NAPFA lor NBCB... Even POP all rehearsals and actual day Standard FBO No Newspapers/Drink Cans (only my section, cos Sec Com Siao) haha but no complaints! I miss Chiong Sua!